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How To See Ip Address Of Wifi

8/26/2021
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Do you know what’s on your network? In this guide, we’ll show you a few simple ways you can find an IP address on your network. We’ll also go over a few great tools that can speed up this process and give you further insight into your network.

How to find the cameras IP address. Note before proceeding please ensure your phone is connected to the same local WiFi network as the camera, the steps shown are the same for both iOS and Android platforms. Firstly go to the My Camera page in the app, tap the arrow to the right of the camera and then select the 'Edit camera' symbol. Mar 01, 2021 Find your IP address. Your Mac's private IP address will be listed in the 'IP Address' entry. On older versions of OS X, you'll need to click the 'TCP/IP' tab at the top of the window to see the 'IP Address' entry. How to find the IP address of your router using an iPhone or iPad 1. Tap 'Settings' and then tap 'Wi-Fi.' To access your wireless router, it is often required that you have the IP address assigned to the device. You can retrieve the devices IP address using a computer that is hooked up to your wireless network. Step 1 Click the 'Start' menu button on the Microsoft Windows desktop. The cameras IP address will be shown under 'local'. Enter this address directly into the address bar of your web browser, do not type it into google or another search engine as you will not get the correct result. The address should be entered as shown in our example below, From here you can login to the camera.

Whether you’re managing an office network, or just doing some troubleshooting at home, knowing how to find a device’s IP address is critical in solving a number of networking problems.

Let’s start with the most basic method of finding your own local IP address in two easy steps.

  1. Open a command line window. In Windows, you can do this by pressing Windows Key + R, and then typing cmd in the Run box and hitting enter. In Linux, this can be done by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T.
  2. Type ipconfig in the command line if you’re on Windows, and ifconfig if you’re on Linux. Press enter to get a list of your PC’s IP configuration.

In the command prompt, you’ll find your IPv4 address towards the top. Under it, you’ll see your subnet mask and your default gateway. This information is vital, especially if you’re having issues connecting to the internet.

But what about finding other IP addresses that might be on your network?

To find other IP addresses that are on your local network, type arp -a in the same command prompt window and press enter. A list of IP addresses will populate on your screen along with additional information you might find helpful.

IP Addresses

In the far left-hand column you’ll see a list of IP addresses that were discovered on your network. Towards the bottom of the list, you may see some addresses starting with 224, 239, or 255. These addresses are generally reserved by your router for administrative purposes, so these can be looked over.

Physical Addresses

In the second column under Physical Addresses we’ll see each device’s physical address. This is also commonly referred to as a MAC address. A physical address is a unique identifier that every network device comes with. Unlike IP addresses, this number cannot be changed. Knowing a device’s physical address is important, especially if you want to identify exactly what is on your network.

Type

The last column displays the address’s type. There are two types of IP addresses, dynamic and static. A dynamic address means that a DHCP server gave that device an IP address. A static address means that the device was configured to use a specific IP address, one that won’t change.

Static addresses are great for devices that are permanent, like printers or servers. Most home networks will be fine using DHCP to hand out IP addresses. DHCP servers assign IP addresses that have leases. Once that lease is up, that device might get a different IP address.

Troubleshooting

How To Find Ip Address Of Wifi Camera

From your command prompt, you’re a bit limited in how you can interact with devices on the network. You can attempt to ping an IP address on your network by typing ping 192.168.XX.XXX (Replace the X’s with your IP address.)

Most devices will answer the ping and reply back. This is a quick and easy way to determine if there are any latency issues between your PC and that device. For further troubleshooting, we’re going to need to use some network analyzer tools.

These tools are great for quickly finding devices on your local network and spotting problems fast. They also provide a lot more details than your trusty old command prompt can give you.

Below are three of my favorite network scanning programs.

SolarWinds Port Scanner (FREE TOOL)

If you need more detail and functionality from your Port Scanner then SolarWinds has you covered. You can easily scan your network by IP ranges and filter by ports to identify what services a device is running. SolarWinds Port Scanner is currently a Windows tool only.

SolarWinds Port Scanner also automatically resolves hostnames to help you identify what devices are on your network faster. The GUI interface is easy to use and boasts a cleaner display than Angry IP Scanner.

For those who live in the command line, you’ll be glad to hear this tool comes with a fully functional CLI and support for batch scripting.

While these tools are great, they won’t proactively alert you to problems on your network such as duplicate IP addresses, or DHCP exhaustion.

If you’re a small business administrator, or just a curious tech looking for a bit more insight into your network, SolarWinds Port Scanner is an excellent tool and is available as a free download.

Paessler PRTG Network Scanning Tools (FREE TRIAL)

If you’re a network administrator like myself, you’ll find PRTG Network Monitor an extremely valuable tool when it comes to troubleshooting problems across your network. PRTG is really the evolution of a scanning tool and more of a complete network monitor.

PRTG first scans the entire network in its network discovery process, listing any devices it can find. Once the scan is complete it keeps a real-time inventory of all devices and records when any are removed or added.

PRTG’s sensors are perfect for in-depth testing across your networks. Ping sensors can easily monitor a device’s connectivity over the long term, and alert you to those intermittent connection problems that can be difficult to pin down.

The PRTG scanner goes a step further by also incorporating database monitoring into its suite of tools. This sensor will alert you to any outages or long wait times in almost any SQL environment. Database monitoring can help identify small problems such as stalled processes before they cause major downtime.

Lastly, PRTG can thoroughly monitor bandwidth and network utilization for your environment. When things slow to a crawl, you’ll be able to quickly identify which IP addresses are using the most bandwidth and pinpoint exactly what that traffic is.

Is someone streaming too much Netflix? With the usage monitoring sensor, you’ll never have to guess what is hogging up your bandwidth again. This data is beautifully displayed as a chart, and broken down by IP address, protocol, or top connections.

When you have a sample of data you’d like to save, you can easily export it to XML or CSV. You can even tap into the PRTG API and export your data in real-time.

PRTG is a powerful on-premise tool and is geared mostly for medium to large businesses. It installs in a Windows server environment and gives you full control of what sensors you’d like to activate. If you’d like to test it out yourself you can download a 30-day free trial.

Angry IP Scanner

One of my favorite free tools is the Angry IP Scanner. It’s compatible with Mac, Linux, and Windows and allows you to quickly find detailed information about devices that are on your network.

Simply select an IP range at the top and let Angry IP Scanner work its magic. Almost instantly Angry IP will begin pulling information about the IP range you specified.

At a glance you’ll be able to see what IP addresses are open for assignment, taken by devices, and how many ports each device has open.

If you’re having trouble finding a device on your network, Angry IP Scanner makes it simple to track down that device for further troubleshooting.

How To Find Ip Address Of Wifi Connected Devices

Angry IP Scanner has personally helped me find devices that have lost their static IP address without having to physically go to the device.

If you’re looking to export and save your findings, you can easily download your results in CSV, XML, or text format. It is available as a free download.

Final Thoughts

No matter what size network you’re troubleshooting, understanding how to find a device’s IP address is essential.

How to see ip address

Whether you’re quickly looking up the ARP table with the arp -a command, or utilizing a network tool like PRTG, having a solid grasp of what’s on your network will help keep all of your device safe, and yourself headache free.

This document describes how to determine your device'sEthernet or Wireless hardware address(es). You need to know your hardware address(es) in order toregister your device in the Princeton University Host Database.

If you need assistance following these instructions, orneed assistance determining the Ethernet or Wireless hardware address ofa platform not covered by this document, please contact the OIT Support and Operations Center(phone 609-258-HELP, [email protected]).

Contents

Instructions for Some Common Platforms

What is an Ethernet or Wireless Hardware Address?

An Ethernet or Wireless hardware address is a number assigned to the hardware interface in (or attached to) your computer or printer. It is assigned by the manufacturer of that Ethernet or Wireless interface, not by Princeton University.All manufacturers of Ethernet and Wireless interfaces cooperate to ensure that everyhardware interface has a unique address.

If your computer has both an Ethernet interface and a Wireless interface,each will have its own unique hardware address.

An Ethernet or Wireless hardware address is a 6-byte hexadecimal number; for example:080007A9B2FC. Each byte is written as two hexadecimal digits, so thereare twelve hexadecimal digits; each hex digit is a number from 0-9 or a letter from A-F.The letters A-F may be uppercase or lowercase.

Sometimes an '0x' is written before the value to make explicit that the following value should interpreted as hexadecimal. This '0x' is not part of the value.

Ethernet and Wireless hardware addresses are often written in other forms, to make themeasier to understand. It is common separate the six pairs of hexadecimal digits (the A-F are considered hexadecimal digits,rather than letters) with colons or dashes, like: 08:00:07:A9:B2:FCor00-00-94-ba-0e-cc.When using colons or dashes to separate the address into six pairs,sometimes any leading zero in each pair of digits is dropped; e.g. 8:0:7:A9:B2:FC or0:0:94:ba:e:cc. (When dropping leadings zeroes in a hardware address, '00' becomes '0' -- you never completely eliminate any of the six pairs of digits.)

Do not confuse an Ethernet or Wireless hardware address with an Internet Protocol v4 ('IPv4')address; that's a number assigned to some computers and printers by the Princeton University, and looks something like:128.112.1.2 or 140.180.1.2. Your Ethernet or Wireless hardware address is also not your email address, which typically looks something like[email protected].

The Easiest Way to Discover a Hardware Address

Often, the fastest way to discover a device's Ethernet or Wireless hardware address is to look fora printed label. For example, if you buy an Ethernet or Wireless interface card, checkthe box it came in for a label; you may recognize the hardware addresson the label. Other times, the actual interface may have a stickylabel somewhere on it with the hardware address.Address

If your computer or printer has a built-in Ethernet or Wireless interface, you mayfind a label attached to the back or bottom of the computer displayingthe hardware address.

If you find a label, make sure it really is a hardware address; the section above describes what an Ethernet or Wireless hardware address looks like. For example, if you see letters of the alphabet other than A-F, you can be sure you're not looking at an Ethernet or Wireless hardware address; perhaps it is a modelnumber or serial number for your computer.

In some cases, you will not find a hardware address displayed on the box, the Ethernet or Wireless interface, or the computer or printer. (Or you mayhave discarded the box, and opening the computer or printer to examinethe interface card inside may not be a good choice.) In these cases,there is usually software you can run on the computer or printer thatwill display the Ethernet or Wireless hardware address. Instructions for some popularconfigurations appear below.

Address

Forging (Spoofing, Cloning) Another Hardware Address is not Acceptable

Many devices can be reconfigured so that instead of using the hardwareaddress assigned by the manufacturer, they instead forgeanother hardware address of your own choosing.This is sometimes called 'spoofing' or 'cloning' a hardware address,particularly when the forged hardware address is one that belongs toanother device.

Because a device's hardware address is one of the most importantways the device is identified on the campus network, forginga hardware address is not acceptable on the campus network.No device attached to the campus network should be configured to forge its hardware address;instead, every device attached to the campus network should use the unique hardware addressassigned to it by the manufacturer.

Randomized Hardware Addresses Are (Usually) Not Acceptable

Some devices automatically change their network interface's hardware addressfrom time to time, for example, by generatinga new random (or pseudo-random) hardware address. Some do so periodically.Some do so each time the network interface attaches to a different network.

Such devices do so in the belief that it promotes privacy.More often than not, such devices limit this feature to Wireless networkinterfaces.

For some devices, this is a behavior which can be user-configured;for other devices, it is not user-configurable.

For the most part, we do not support use of such deviceson the University's networks. Each device attached via an Ethernet or Wirelessnetwork interface at the University is expected to use the unique hardware address assigned by the manufacturer to that network interface, not to generate random values or to change the value periodicallyor each time it connects to a different network.

If your device allows you to configure it to generaterandom hardware addresses or to use its real hardware address, you shouldconfigure it to use its real hardware address. If your device generates random hardware addresses and offers no way to disablethis behavior, the device is not appropriate for use on the University network.

There is a specific exception where such behavior is acceptable on the University network.When a Wireless interface is probing (scanning) to locate available wireless networks,it may choose to use a random hardware address for the wireless frames it transmitsto perform those probes. The remainder of the Wireless frames the device transmits (for example, once it decides it wishesto connect to a particular wireless network) use the unique hardware address assigned by the manufacturer to that device's Wireless network interface. This behavior is acceptable.

Windows 95, 98, ME

The process of obtaining your ethernet address is fairly simple in Windows 95,Windows 98,andWindows ME.You need to have, at least, installed the Microsoft TCPIP protocol to use this method. If you have installed the MS TCPIP protocol do the following:

  1. Click on Start.
  2. Click on Run.
  3. In the command line box which appears, enter the following and press the Enter key:
  4. A box will appear with a variety of information.Check the pull-down menu near the top to verify that yourEthernet interface is selected; if it is not, then select itin this menu.
  5. Look for the line labelled Adapter Address.This is your Ethernet interface's hardware address.It will be written out completely as 6 pairs of2 digits separted by hyphens. Write it down.
  6. If your machine has a wireless card, select Wireless interface from the drop down menu. Look for the Adapter Address under this section andwrite it down.
  7. Click on the X in the top right-hand corner of the box to close the windows.You are now finished.

Troubleshooting

If you are unable to see your Ethernet interface in the window displayed bythe winipcfg command,refer to the OIT KnowledgeBase solution:http://helpdesk.princeton.edu/kb/display.plx?ID=5094.

Windows NT 4.0

You can find your ethernet address using Microsoft's ipconfig utility:

  1. Click the Start button.
  2. Select Programs and then select Command Prompt.
  3. At the C:> prompt, enter the following then press the Enter key:
  4. Your machine's ethernet address is listed as the Physical Address.
  5. If your machine has both an Ethernet and a Wireless connection, twoPhysical Adresseswill be shown in different sections. The Ethernet hardware address is listed under Ethernet Adapter Local Area Connectionand the Wireless hardware address will be listed under Ethernet Adapter Wireless Network Connection.
  6. To close the Command Prompt window,enter the following at the C:> prompt then press the Enter key:

Windows 2000, XP

What Is My Wireless Ip Address

You can find your machine's Ethernet or Wireless hardware addresses using Microsoft's ipconfig utility:

  1. Click the Start button.
  2. Select Programs and then select Accessories/Command Prompt.
  3. At the C:> prompt, enter the following then press the Enter key:
  4. Your machine's Ethernet or Wireless hardware address is listed as the Physical Address.
  5. If your machine has both an Ethernet and a Wireless connection, two Physical Adresseswill be shown in different sections. The Ethernet hardware address is listed under Ethernet Adapter Local Area Connectionand the Wireless hardware address will be listed under Ethernet Adapter Wireless Network Connection.
  6. To close the Command Prompt window,enter the following at the C:> prompt then press the Enter key:

Windows Vista, Windows 7

You can find your machine's Ethernet or Wireless hardware addresses using Microsoft's getmac utility:

  1. If your device is a Dell laptop, ensure it is plugged into an electrical outlet;if it is not plugged in, the device's Ethernet address will not be displayed.
  2. Click the Start button.
  3. In the Search box, enter the following then press the Enter key:
  4. At the DOS prompt, enter the following then press the Enter key:
  5. Your machine's Ethernet or Wireless hardware addresses are listed as the Physical Addresses.
  6. If your machine has both an Ethernet and a Wireless connection, twoPhysical Adresseswill be shown in different sections. The Ethernet hardware address is listed under Ethernet Adapter Local Area Connectionand the Wireless hardware address will be listed under Ethernet Adapter Wireless Network Connection.
  7. To close the Command Prompt window,enter the following at the C:> prompt then press the Enter key:

Windows 8

You can find your machine's Ethernet or Wireless hardware address using Microsoft's getmac utility.

  1. Navigate to the Charm Bar through one of the following methods:
    • Move the cursor to the bottom right corner of the screen to access the hot corner for the Charm Bar
    • Windows key - 'C' command will open up the Charm Bar.
  2. Start a search by selecting the Magnifying Glass icon at the top.
  3. Search for 'Command Prompt' then press the Enter key.
  4. At the DOS prompt, enter the following then press the Enter key
  5. Your machine's Ethernet or Wireless hardware addresses are listed as the Physical Addresses.
  6. If your machine has both an Ethernet and a Wireless connection, twoPhysical Adresseswill be shown in different sections. The Ethernet hardware address is listed under Ethernet Adapter Local Area Connectionand the Wireless hardware address will be listed under Ethernet Adapter Wireless Network Connection.
  7. To close the Command Prompt window,enter the following at the C:> prompt then press the Enter key:

Apple macOS 10.12 - 10.15

To display your Apple macOS device's Ethernet or Wireless hardware addresses:

  1. Make sure that the network interface you're interested in is part of the current location,and is turned 'on':
    1. Open the System Preferences application in the Apple menu.

      The System Preferences application is also sometimes available in the Dock.It's also available in the Applications folder (in macOS 10.12 - 10.15).

    2. Click the Network icon in the System Preferences application.
    3. The Network pane of the System Preferences applicationdisplays a Location pop-up menu near the top of its window.

      In this Location pop-up menu, select a location that includesthe network interface of interest.

      For macOS 10.12 - 10.15:You can verify that a network interface (port) is a member of a location by selectingthat location, then verifying that the network interface of interest appears in the network ports liston the left side of the window.Verify that the interface's status (which appears in grey just below the name of the interface)is anything other than 'Inactive.'

    4. If you made any changes in this window, click the Apply buttonin the lower right corner of the window.
    5. If you made any changes in the Network pane in System Preferences that youwon't want to retain, make a note of them now, so you can undo them later.
    6. Once you've verified that the network interface you're interested in is part of the current locationand is anything except 'inactive (in macOS 10.12 - 10.15),you can select Quit System Preferences from the File menu.
  2. In macOS 10.12 - 10.15, launch the System Information application.

    This program is normally located in the Utilities folder,which in turn is located in the Applications folder.

  3. The left side of the application's window is a pane listing categories and subcategoriesabout which information is available.From this pane, select Network.
  4. Displayed in the upper-right pane is a list of each of theMac's network interfaces that are part of the current network location and (and macOS 10.12 - 10.15) are anything except 'inactive.'(In macOS 10.12 - 10.15, these are entitled 'Active Services'.)

    In this upper-right pane,select the item for the Ethernet or Wi-Fi (a.k.a. Deep cycle battery charger. 'Wireless') interface in which you are interested.

  5. Displayed in the lower-right pane is information about the selected network interface.

    Each interface's hardware address is the value labelled Ethernet address,MAC address, or Hardware (MAC) addressThis is true even if the device is actually a wireless interface.(It is not the item labelled RouterHardwareAddressor the item labelled ARPResolvedHardwareAddress.Make a note of the value; this is the information you were seeking.

  6. Quit theSystem Information application (in macOS 10.12 - 10.15),
  7. If earlier you changed any settings in the Network pane of System Preferences(for example, to make a particular network interface active) and you wish to change it back, do so now.

Apple iOS 4.0 - 14.3

To display your Apple iOS device'sWireless hardware address:

  1. Open the Settings application.
  2. From the list of setting categories, select General.
  3. From the list of general settings, select About.
  4. The Wireless hardware address is the value labelled Wi-Fi Address.
  5. Leave the Settings application.

Android 2.2 - 5.0.1

To display your Android device's Wireless hardware address:

  1. Open the Settings application.
  2. From the list of setting categories, select About phone.

    Some vendors locate this category underneath some other category;this can vary from device to device.

    This item also might be named something else, for example, About tablet.

  3. From the list of choices, select Hardware information.On some versions of Android, you may instead need to choose Status.
  4. The Wireless hardware address is the value labeled Wi-Fi MAC Address.
  5. Leave the Settings application.
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Last Updated: January 2 2021